Much Ado About Nothing

23, jewellery designer, Scotland

He said to her, “who are you going to believe? The mirror, a photograph, or the eyes of the man who thinks you’re the most beautiful girl on the planet?

-i.c. “Beauty is in the Eye…”  (via sarraht)

(via myownliteraryself)


Abandoned Victorian Style Greenhouse, Villa Maria, in northern Italy near Lake Como. Photo taken in 1985 by Friedhelm Thomas

Abandoned Victorian Style Greenhouse, Villa Maria, in northern Italy near Lake Como. Photo taken in 1985 by Friedhelm Thomas

(via elllefoxx)

How To Feel Better - Step Two (Homemade Banana and Carrot cake curtesy of my amazing colleague, Eleanor ❤️)

How To Feel Better - Step Two (Homemade Banana and Carrot cake curtesy of my amazing colleague, Eleanor ❤️)

I think how long it takes you to delete someone’s existence from your life really is a measure of how important they were.

It took me 2 minutes to erase you.

#singleandreadytomingle

#singleandreadytomingle

mini-girlz:

A noble woman as the goddess Venus
dressing her hair. The diadem identifies her as Venus. 
Bronze; 9 ½ inches high
ca. First Century
Through Aeneas, the gens (clan) of the Julians claimed that Venus was their ancestor. The Julians included Julius Caesar as well as Augustus. Aeneas was the son of Anchises and Aphrodite. According to Homer, Aeneas was an officer in the Trojan army who was treated as an equal of the gods. He left Troy with his father and son and wandered around the Mediterranean. In Homer’s Iliad, Aeneas went to Sicily, and perhaps the Italian peninsula. Other ancient writers associate Aeneas with the founding of the Latin League, though not Rome itself. In Vergil’s Aeneid, Aeneas was much more closely tied to the actual establishment of Rome.
Because there are so many similar versions of this depiction of Venus, scholars believe there was a Greek statue, now lost, from which they were copied.
via > antiquitiesexperts.com

mini-girlz:

A noble woman as the goddess Venus

dressing her hair. The diadem identifies her as Venus. 

Bronze; 9 ½ inches high

ca. First Century

Through Aeneas, the gens (clan) of the Julians claimed that Venus was their ancestor. The Julians included Julius Caesar as well as Augustus. Aeneas was the son of Anchises and Aphrodite. According to Homer, Aeneas was an officer in the Trojan army who was treated as an equal of the gods. He left Troy with his father and son and wandered around the Mediterranean. In Homer’s Iliad, Aeneas went to Sicily, and perhaps the Italian peninsula. Other ancient writers associate Aeneas with the founding of the Latin League, though not Rome itself. In Vergil’s Aeneid, Aeneas was much more closely tied to the actual establishment of Rome.

Because there are so many similar versions of this depiction of Venus, scholars believe there was a Greek statue, now lost, from which they were copied.

via > antiquitiesexperts.com

(via escapismosensorial)